Tag Archives: log cabin knitting

Log cabin pick up lines, Rose City Yarn Crawl

No, it’s not about dating in the pioneer days! (Hey baby, wanna go for a buggy ride?)

I taught a log cabin knitting class last month, and I wanted to revisit how I pick up my stitches along the selvage edges before class. I had recently read a post describing how to pick up and knit these stitches, and it wasn’t how I was doing it.

This new-to-me way involves picking up in the edge stitches with a separate needle (slide it through the last horizontal clam shell), and then knitting them off. My edge stitches of the previous square are stretched out and distorted, making them look straight instead of like the purl bump clamshells that we know and love. See it on the red edge stitches? And the white pickup area where I picked up the new green block is also pulling on the diagonal.

So I did a little experiment.

Section 1 is picked up in the edge stitches with a knitting needle, then knit through the front loops. It pulls on the diagonal.

Section 2 is picked up in the edge stitches with a knitting needle, then knit through the back loops. Not so diagonal, but still distorts the stitch.

Section 3 is picked up and knit under the single strand between garter bumps.

Section 4 is picked up and knit under two strands between garter bumps. This leaves a bigger ridge on the back, but it matches the bigger ridges of the pickups along the bound off edges. You know to pick up in the front half of the bound off edge, right? If you pick up in the back half, the front half of that bound off stitch leaves a line on the front of your work.

Result: I still like picking up under the thread between garter bumps, whether under one or two strands.

Is this incredibly fussy of me? Yes. Would you notice it if I hadn’t told you? Maybe. But sometimes fussing makes me happy.

Your mileage may vary; part of it depends on how tightly or loosely you knit. I recommend experimenting to see what looks best with the way *you* knit. Remember, as long as you get the result you want, you’re doing it right!

Here are my finished Log Cabin Mitts, this time in Noro Taiyo Sport. They’re adorable. The pattern is free from Karen Templer of Fringe Association. I made them for the #logalong on Instagram.

And Rose City Yarn Crawl is upon us! Click the link for details on ALL the fun. It runs Thursday through Sunday. I’m having a group trunk show with fellow local designers Shannon Squire and Debbi Stone, and dyer Lorajean Kelley (Knitted Wit) at For Yarn’s Sake on Thursday (tomorrow!) from 10 am to 4 pm. Come by and say hi! I love seeing what you’ve knit (I know you’ll be wearing it!) and I’ll have my newest designs with me for you to squish.

You know there will be some brioche. I taught my first Petite Brioche class last week, and everyone was well on their way by the end of class. Team Brioche is growing!

Wishing you a very yarny weekend, whether you’re yarn crawling, or not!

At loose ends seeking new project, and a book winner

First of all: Drumroll! The winner of the Japanese Shetland Lace Knitting book is…carrotmusic, aka Karen. Congratulations!

I just bound off my last (for now) brioche project. It’s the cowl I started before I took the deep dive into the brioche hats. (Hats are currently being test knit, and the pictures coming in are lovely.)

I’m looking forward to wearing this cowl. Although Biscuit thinks that it belongs to her.

There *is* precedent for cats and cowls! (Mookie in my Sakura cowl, 2016.)

My needles are currently empty, and I’m not sure what to knit next. I need to get back to my beaded 2 color version of my Nymphaea shawl (shown here in a lovely purple gradient from June Pryce Fiber Arts, available from Bead Biz.)

I’m knitting it in green and blue, the same colors as in my Tumbling Leaves, but with Atlantic as the main color and Hellebore as the contrast color. Yes, I loved these colors in Bumblebirch’s Heartwood so much that I’m using them again! But I don’t need this shawl until Oregon Flock and Fiber Festival in September when the pattern returns to me, so it’s not urgent.

I was hoping to do a Snowy Woods Log Cabin blanket for the #fringeandfriendslogalong, but that was derailed by my brioche obsession. It’s late in the logalong game, but I’m tempted to knit a pair of Karen Templer’s Log Cabin Mitts (free pattern, just published on her Fringe Association site). After knitting the log cabin blocks, there’s a mitered square thumb, which looks cool. I haven’t done a log cabin block with a mitered square in it yet, so that would be exciting. I just looked in my stash, and this may be do-able. Either 3 shades of Knit Picks Wool of the Andes, or a single color shifting skein of Noro Taiyo (which isn’t very soft…).

Or should I be restrained and just knit some log cabin washcloths from the Mason-Dixon Knitting Field Guide #4? They’ve elaborated on their pick up method a little bit since the blankets in their original book, which is where I learned to log cabin. I need to see if I like the new way better. Only one way to find out!

What’s on your needles? Inspire me!